rhea137 via friendsofart.net / posted on 29 July 2014

1910-again:


Piet Mondrian, Night Landscape c.1907-1908

1910-again:

Piet Mondrian, Night Landscape c.1907-1908

(via ekkolalia)

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rhea137 / posted on 28 July 2014

the book that doesn’t offer us a rare and revealing portrait of the artist as a poor man

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rhea137 via aqqindex / posted on 28 July 2014

aqqindex:

Ettore Sottsass, Esprit Hamburg, 1985

aqqindex:

Ettore Sottsass, Esprit Hamburg, 1985

(via vuls)

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rhea137 via awwww-cute / posted on 28 July 2014

awwww-cute:


He gets himself into the wierdest situations

awwww-cute:

He gets himself into the wierdest situations

(via dialoghost)

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rhea137 via ghostofmepast / posted on 28 July 2014

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rhea137 via blackandoakland / posted on 28 July 2014


rhea137 / posted on 28 July 2014


rhea137 / posted on 28 July 2014

When the first drops of a thunderstorm smash against your skin, stand still. Like a tree.

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/ posted on 28 July 2014

The heroes of Albert Camus’s books can be quite annoying: surly, self-dramatising Hamlets who like to think of themselves as strong, silent loners, wise to human folly. But although they are often arrogant, self-absorbed and predictable, they are also susceptible to the weather, and happy to be upstaged by unseasonable storms, torpid nights, fierce sunlight, or the chance of a swim in the limpid sea.

This persona first appeared in a collection of experimental stories called L’Envers et l’endroit, published in Algiers in 1937. Camus was 24, and already a virtuoso, his prose at once spare and musical. It was a style with a definite purpose: to track down the ‘irony’ that stalks the world, often unnoticed but always plain to see. He discovers it in a hotel in Prague when somebody dies in a neighbouring room, or facing the inhuman beauty of Italy, or observing a dying grandmother and her inattentive family in Algeria. He is always alert to ‘absurdity’, as he calls it; but then something will bring him up short. ‘Just look,’ he says, ‘just look at the smile of the sky.’

When the book was reissued twenty years later, Camus added a preface recalling his childhood. He was born in 1913, to an illiterate, fatherless family on a working-class estate in eastern Algeria. ‘I was poised midway between poverty and sunshine,’ he wrote, and it wasn’t until he saw what it was like to live in a cold climate that he understood social injustice. Poverty was proof that history is unfair: the sun was a reminder that ‘history is not everything.’

Jonathan Rée reviews ‘Camus and Sartre’ by Ronald Aronson · LRB 20 January 2005

rhea137 via lialovesleopards / posted on 28 July 2014

(via 8823dsn)

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rhea137 via itscolossal / posted on 28 July 2014

itscolossal:


Ever get a salty swig of seawater in your mouth when you’re at the beach? Well this is what was in it. Check out this amazing photo of a single drop of seawater, magnified 25 times. Don’t say we didn’t warn you. Photo by David Littschwager.

itscolossal:

Ever get a salty swig of seawater in your mouth when you’re at the beach? Well this is what was in it. Check out this amazing photo of a single drop of seawater, magnified 25 times. Don’t say we didn’t warn you. Photo by David Littschwager.

(via timtimtim)

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rhea137 via brooklynmuseum.org / posted on 28 July 2014

design-is-fine:

Art Smith, Lava Bracelet, 1946. Silver. Brooklyn Museum. The bracelet, or cuff, extends over the entire lower arm in undulating and overlapping forms.

design-is-fine:

Art Smith, Lava Bracelet, 1946. Silver. Brooklyn Museum. The bracelet, or cuff, extends over the entire lower arm in undulating and overlapping forms.

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rhea137 via theblueplanet / posted on 28 July 2014

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